Mitchell Nathanson

Mitch Nathanson is a Professor of Law at Villanova University and the author of numerous books and articles on baseball, the law and society. He is a two-time winner of the McFarland-SABR Award, which is presented in recognition of the best historical or biographical baseball articles of the year.  His biography of the mercurial slugger Dick Allen: "God Almighty Hisself: The Life and Legacy of Dick Allen," was a finalist for the 2017 Seymour Medal.  His most recent book, BOUTON: The Life of a Baseball Original," (2020) explores the life of a man who won all of 62 games but who changed professional sports in ways 300-game winners never could. To which Jim Bouton's Seattle Pilot teammate, Jim Gosger, would most likely say, "Yeah surrre."

 

Expertise

1960s/70s Baseball Cultural History

Baseball and Society

Available for 

Public Speaking

Pod Cast & Radio Interviews

Media Quotes & Inquiries

Contact Info

email: nathanson@law.villanova.edu  Website: www.mitchellnathanson.com  Twitter: @MitchNathanson 

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Books

BOUTON: The Life of a Baseball Original

IBouton: The Life of a Baseball Original explores the life of a man who won all of 62 games but who changed professional sports in ways 300-game winners never could.  From Ball Four to broadcasting, Jim Bouton radicalized everything he touched.  But at a price.

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God Almighty Hisself: The Life and Legacy of Dick Allen

Dick Allen is considered by some to be the best baseball player not in the Hall of Fame and by others to be the game’s most destructive and divisive force--ever. God Almighty Hisself: The Life and Legacy of Dick Allen unveils the strange and maddening career of a man who fulfilled and frustrated expectations all at once.

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A People's History of Baseball

Challenging the myths of America’s national pastime

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The Fall of the 1977 Phillies: How a Baseball Team's Collapse Sank a City's Spirit

Examining one city’s century-long tortured relationship with its baseball team and, ultimately, itself.

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